Image Consulting For Kids

What do you think about girls, some as young as 9, visiting an "image consultant?"

I think it's whacked (plus look at the lady in the image coaching the kid).

Can we not just allow our kids to just grow up semi-naturally? Do we have to plan and organize and assist with every move they make?

The Washington Post reports on this hot young market in "The Minor Makeover;"

"In the past couple of years, the market of 12-to-20-year olds has
absolutely grown," says Los Angeles stylist and image consultant Abby
Michelle Moll, who works with adult clients and their kids. "It's being
driven by the media and the Internet."

The Post goes on to report that reality shows like "How Do I Look?" and "What Not to Wear" usually
center on the remarkable before-and-after transformations of the
participants. Maybe it was only a matter of time before the trend hit
teens and preteens. The idea of perpetually camera-ready teens is what
youth market analysts call KGOY, "kids getting older younger," which
is, of course, no new phenomenon. 

Jezebel's perspective on this trend is spot on;

"It seems a little strange that some of the issues re: self-esteem
are being addressed externally as opposed to internally."

Ya think?!

Let me tell you something – kids have a style of their own. They figure out this stuff on their own. From my 6 year old son demanding to wear ONLY silky sports shorts and tank tops (with no undies or free-balling as he likes to call it), to my 9 year old daughter mixing together the oddest get ups you've ever seen – and she looks so dang cool.

Parents, let's not butt in on this process.

Hold back on shoving what is likely YOUR insecurities on your kids.

Let''s give them a chance to grow into who they are meant to be.

-mV


Image: My babies on the pier up north just a few days ago.

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7 Responses to Image Consulting For Kids

  1. Alex says:

    Thank you so much for this post, this is a issue that I have been dying to discuss.
    My opinion:
    Kids shouldn’t be directed and told what they look good in and what they should wear.
    They SHOULDEN’T wear anything in that sense, they should wear what they feel comfortable in and what they want to wear. (Don’t misjudge me here, I am not saying that kids can go around wearing high heels and get million dollar clothes just because they want to.)
    All I am saying that the world of style today would be so much more varied, interesting and beautiful if kids were aloud to develop their own sense style. Not to mention their self-esteem and sense of individuality might be in much better shape as well.
    Hugs from
    Alex <3

  2. "Julia" says:

    Totally agree with Alex.
    The pressure was on me from an early age that I had to wear what everyone else was wearing in order to fit in and be popular. Somewhere along the way, I learned that my individual style had no value and that I was not entitled to be myself.
    An additional problem with pressuring clothes is that it often has a link to the size of those same clothes. Particularly in late childhood/early adolescence, there is a struggle to find clothes that fit. Juniors clothing is too skinny or too long, while children’s clothing is too “uncool” and too skinny or too short.
    I learned from this that I needed to be thin and that I needed to blend in with the scenery by dressing the same way as everyone else (at the time this involved a lot of glitter shirts and weirdly designed sleeves and hems–all of which I loathed beyond belief).
    I am truly apalled that they are now doing this to that same, target age group for trauma. It’s the worst time in the world to put any more pressure on these kids to be “perfect.” While the seeds of eating disorders are sewn earlier, adolescence is often when the “last straw” falls and people start to truly develop an ED.

  3. pageantL says:

    The only time I have heard of this for kids is in beauty pageants, and that is geared toward a specific day or weekend, not a child’s entire life.

  4. S says:

    N/t to do w/ this. I saw an ad of Bacardi Breezer and Purex on the same page of Good Housekeeping’s August issue. It was an endorsed by a company in an advertisement. There have also been ads of the Jeans you mentioned in the past few issues of the mag too. All three ads you mentioned in one issue. Worth mentioning.

  5. km says:

    “I think it’s whacked (plus look at the lady in the image coaching the kid).”
    Wow… in your first paragraph, first you talk about how awful it is that people feel the need to visit an image consultant – and then you criticize the appearance of the woman in the photo! Don’t you realize that you are contributing to the negativity our society has about women’s bodies? For someone who claims to be blogging about body image for several years now, you really have a lot to learn.

  6. SMM says:

    “Wow… in your first paragraph, first you talk about how awful it is that people feel the need to visit an image consultant – and then you criticize the appearance of the woman in the photo! Don’t you realize that you are contributing to the negativity our society has about women’s bodies? For someone who claims to be blogging about body image for several years now, you really have a lot to learn.”
    I couldn’t have put it better.

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