Beauty is a con game.

We are all suckers. Suckers in the biggest con game in history.

Everyday we paint on our faces, slather on our potions and play make believe that somehow these magic $90 elixirs are a doorway to beauty…..to being loved.

The beauty industry peels the cash out of your wallet with a huge smile on its face, laughing behind your back as they literally steal you blind.

Read this ad for “Bliss…The Youth as we know it”cream from Sephora Age Control section.

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An extraordinary age-fighting moisture cream that has it all, including MMP Inhibitors, Wrinkle Reduction Peptides, Visual Facial Fillers, Cellular Respiration Boosters, Hyperdermal Destressors, 7-Day Hydrators, Barrier Repairing Ceramides, Wrinkle Relaxers, Multifruit Complex, and Vitazyme A.

Are you shittin’ me? Tell me what the hell is a cellular Respiration Booster? How about a Hyperdermal Destressor? This is all bullshit ladies, and you are buying it at $79 bucks a pop.

What do I use? Generic Cetaphil. Walmart $2.89.

Listen, we are all going to get old. What is so bad about old? Did you ever ask yourself this question? I like old. My best friends, my parents, my mentors are old. I don’t love and admire them because they are beautiful, or skinny. They are who they are because they listen, they care, they are down to earth, and real.

Not some stretch faced, sun tanned, hard boobed- fake.

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HOPE, in a jar. How inspired.

I don’t know about you, but I will pass. My hope is in my heart. And I will grow old gracefully, thank you.

Don’t play this game girls.

Life is too damn short.

-mamaV

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33 Responses to Beauty is a con game.

  1. Nats says:

    No comment!

  2. Limafan says:

    You can be real and have a sun tan too.

  3. CuriousVisitor says:

    Soap
    Water
    Sunscreen

    Do you really need anything else?

  4. Anon says:

    for this mama i have to agree with you!! my nana (at 80 bless her) is still a private beautician, so she knows all the ins and outs of these things, All brands use the exact same ingrediants, and then just stick some fancy label on it to make it more appealing, using big words that sound like they will do us wonders knowing full well we dont actually know full well what they’re saying and then charge us a bomb for it. Cheapo products are just as good! I use a thing called simple. cheap and affordable..!!! (also its one of the only ones im not allergic to!) The expnsive ones actually put things like perfume and stuf in theirs to make ot smell nice etc…thats not good for your skin!

    with the growing old gracefully….not eveyone can unfortunately. sometimes age isnt as kind to people as others. At my work place there is this woman who is 38 has two kids and is married. she gets id’d everywhere and before i knew her age i thought she wasabout 21-25. Now another person who works there is the same age but looks about 10 years older than their actual age….so whats wrong with a little help?!

  5. Lily says:

    Hi MamaV,

    I totally agree. And I agree with your previous comments on the fashion and beauty industry brainwashing us. Thats what its doing.

    When I was a kid, before my ED, I didnt care much for fancy labels. Some friends around me were very into them, but back then I had a mind of my own and couldnt understand the money my friends spent on clothes in this effort to look ‘cool’.

    Wish I still had opinions and values like I did back then, maybe they are still inside me somewhere and if I recover maybe they’ll come back. I would love that.

    There are shops to ‘be seen’ shopping in where I live, extremely expensive shops where everything is twice the price. It a status thing, and brainwashing. I have resisted this – never bought into the idea of buying in these places.

    The other day I realised I had still held onto this insight that paying twice the price for something one place, when it can be bought for half that elsewhere, is madness.

    So I dont know how I ended up buying into the ‘thin thing’. Isnt it just the same? Believing a thin figure will make us happy? I came from a child who ran around in hand-me-downs from my brothers, to a girl who believes ‘thin’ is the answer.

    Dont know how that happened. Dont know how I let myself be brainwashed like this. And it makes me mad.

    Lily xxx

  6. Julia says:

    some of the most beautiful, most succesfull women out there are the ones that age naturally… anna wintour, for one. she looks wonderful, but her face isn’t perfect. she has wrinkles and looks pretty good.

  7. Imogen says:

    Thanks MamaV.I woke feeling fat, ugly and depressed.
    Reading those last two sentences has saved my day.

  8. Lea says:

    She takes great care in her appearance, trying to keep her skin hydrated and moist, but she, like you, MamaV, uses lots of fresh water and air and a generic face cream. It works. It works for my Mamma, too, who’s mistaken for a 35 year-old at close to 50. She’s never been to a beauty salon in her life!

    Well, I guess what I want to say here is that these people think they can beat the two greatest determinators in whether you’ll look younger than you are or not: lifestyle and genetics. I think they’re predetermining our wrinkly fate at about 50% to 50%.

    Respiration booster… made me think of sweaty gym locker rooms. Gah! My hyperdermal destressor are massaging fingers. Multifruit complexes sound like a diet fad.

    Honestly, do these people even know what they’re writing? Do they assume none of their customers read? Throw around a few big words and nobody’ll get it? Please! There are people who like looking good AND have touched (and even opened! The HORROR!) a book in their lives. So there. 😛

    I have not used make-up in my whole, rather- pardon the language- fucked-up two-decades-plus life. I use mascara (anti-allergenic, for sensitive eyes), lipstick (natural colors- no rosepetal-winegum-somethingerotic-red for me) and a little eyeshadow and blush when I go out. I think that’s the reason I didn’t break out like my teenaged classmates. Sometimes, less is more.

    I think maybe these beauty product manufacturers should be required to do double-blind studies and really prove what they’re claiming to achieve. Maybe they should have a warning about the consequences of their wonderful concoctions on their jars, tins, tubes. Maybe something like: “Warning. Using this hyper-masking Make-up will cause your teenage self even worse acne!” will work. Apparently, it did with cigarettes. A little.

    Umm… sorry for the rant and smiley-ness!

  9. Lea says:

    Hi MamaV!

    You site has been recommended to me by my personal psycho… err, psychologist. He’s aware I make these jokes, so no hard feelings between us- he thinks I’m adjusted and recovered enough to read your blog, and am I ever glad I got here!

    I know most of the things you write about on an intellectual level- I’m pretty level-headed on about everything but my obsession with my weight, and I like to read anything and everything I get my hands on. Reading issues like my own described from the inside, from one who has been there and has come back makes me feel… I don’t know yet, but somehow I think I can glimpse that shimmer of hope in the distance.

    I had to honestly laugh out loud while reading this post. The women in my family are blessed with naturally young looks (I’m being mistaken for a highschool student even though I’ve already graduated from uni and have two Master’s degrees to my name)- and while it’s annoying to be asked for your ID every single time you go out it’s reassuring to look at your grandma and see that it’s possible to be old and look good. Sure, she’s got wrinkles around her eyes, nose and mouth. Sure, there are a few shots of gray in her black hair. But does this make her a prime recipient for ads like the ones you posted? Never!

    She takes great care in her appearance, trying to keep her skin hydrated and moist, but she, like you, MamaV, uses lots of fresh water and air and a generic face cream. It works. It works for my Mamma, too, who’s mistaken for a 35 year-old at close to 50. She’s never been to a beauty salon in her life!

    Well, I guess what I want to say here is that these people think they can beat the two greatest determinators in whether you’ll look younger than you are or not: lifestyle and genetics. I think they’re predetermining our wrinkly fate at about 50% to 50%.

    Respiration booster… made me think of sweaty gym locker rooms. Gah! My hyperdermal destressor are massaging fingers. Multifruit complexes sound like a diet fad.

    Honestly, do these people even know what they’re writing? Do they assume none of their customers read? Throw around a few big words and nobody’ll get it? Please! There are people who like looking good AND have touched (and even opened! The HORROR!) a book in their lives. So there. 😛

    I have not used make-up in my whole, rather- pardon the language- fucked-up two-decades-plus life. I use mascara (anti-allergenic, for sensitive eyes), lipstick (natural colors- no rosepetal-winegum-somethingerotic-red for me) and a little eyeshadow and blush when I go out. I think that’s the reason I didn’t break out like my teenaged classmates. Sometimes, less is more.

    I think maybe these beauty product manufacturers should be required to do double-blind studies and really prove what they’re claiming to achieve. Maybe they should have a warning about the consequences of their wonderful concoctions on their jars, tins, tubes. Maybe something like: “Warning. Using this hyper-masking Make-up will cause your teenage self even worse acne!” will work. Apparently, it did with cigarettes. A little.

    Umm… sorry for the rant and smiley-ness!

  10. Josie says:

    You are right – the beauty industry is playing off our insecurities and societal pressure for women to be simply bodies, and not people. And we’re so desperate to be beautiful we’ll buy into any old crap, especially when everyone else is doing it.

    The people we love and admire the most are not neccessarily beautiful – we love them for their personalities and interests and the way they treat others.

    However, there is a complicated aspect here. Our genetic makeup means that we will always veer towards beautiful people, when looking for friends, partners or employees. It’s not just society doing this, it’s our own pre-programmed minds. Those who ARE beautiful do have a better life than those who are not – fact. So we shouldn’t feel completely pathetic for buying into it a bit.
    However, we can’t override our genetics, and we don’t know how much of our bias is genetic and how much is societal.

    There’s also the question – how much beautifying of ourselves is acceptable?
    If we take MV as an example – she sees it as acceptable to use makeup and dress up in suits, but not acceptable to use anti-ageing creams and cosmetic surgery. Why is that?
    And who decides how much beautifying is too much?
    Maybe we should all stop using makeup, dieting, shaving, wearing clothes, washing more than once every few weeks and brushing our hair.

  11. Rachel says:

    While I don’t buy into the whole ‘beautification’ thing, I do wear makeup about half of the time because there are moments like now when I just look and feel like crap. Knowing that I’ve taken the time to “spruce up,” helps me out a tiny bit at least.

    I shave because my legs feel gross if they’re not. I wash daily(sometimes twice) for similiar reasons. I brush my hair several times a day. I do all of this because A.) I’m a freak about bodily cleanliness. If you stink like B.O. and it’s clear that you haven’t showered, that’s really gross. And B.) I was the ugly, nasty kid in elementary school. I didn’t have any friends because everybody else had an equally sensitive nose to what I’ve got today. My GOD, I must have been awful to deal with!!!!!!!

    Personal hygiene and beautification are two different things. There are excesses on either end of the spectrum.

  12. Josie says:

    Rachel – technically we could go much much longer than we do without washing and not be “unhygienic”. Most people could go without washing for 6 weeks and still have a ‘normal’ level of bacteria.
    Shaving (underarms) is actually less hygienic than letting it grow, because the hairs lift sweat and bacteria away from the skin.

    It seems that the reason we do these things are for beauty purposes, because of societal pressures, and because we’ve been brought up this way, not for any practical reason.

  13. Rachel says:

    Josie-Seriously?! That’s very interesting though, thanks for the input on that! My personal “hygiene code” is based on feeling and smell. I’m also an odd duck because that’s one of my obsessions w/ OCD. Once I start to feel a little bit oily, I feel gross. Then it’s time to shower, which happens a minimum of once per day. (In the winter, it averages to one shower every 1.3 days or so)

    Yeah, I suppose that you’d be right about the beauty purpose thing. Again, though, if somebody does not shower on a regular basis, the fact is that the natural processes build up and create a smelly funk. Personally, I can’t deal with it and it will make me gag just about every time. A person can be one of the nicest people in the world, but I find it really hard to be around them if my nose is bombarded by their offensive odor.

    I am also a special case because my nose seems to be very, uber-sensitive for some reason. I can pick up on most people’s “personal scent” that they emit rather easily. Each individual has a unique chemical make up that creates that personal scent. The olfactory glands (nose) are actually one of the many keys to sexual arousal.

  14. Rachel says:

    Back to the topic at hand: Beauty is a fucking con game and life is too fucking short to spend a lot of time on it.

    Many many cultures ‘beautify’ themselves in one way or another. It’s a way of creating desire for the opposite (or same) sex. Some cultures encourage the women to gain weight for child-bearing purposes and they are conditioned to believe that larger women are sexier (and they are!!) Just as our culture is conditioned to think thin=desireable. It just depends on what is or is not the average. Natural evolutionary processes dictate that if something is scarce, it is desireable. If food and weight are scarce, then eating well and gaining weight is desireable. If food is plentiful, than losing weight is desireable.

    That being said, I am not an “average woman” in our culture. I find some meat on the bones to be drop-dead freakin’ sexy. How I ended up w/ EDish tendencies is a byproduct of obsessive-compulsive disorder. I’ve always been self-conscious about my body, and that, after many years of being self-conscious, reared its ugly head and so I ended up w/ EDNOSish tendencies. Thankfully, I’m out of that frame of mind (easy to do w/ enough medication), and right now, at this moment in time, I could not be happier!! (Amazing in its own right.)

    Back to the post at hand: it’s an over-consumption thing that the beauty industry banks on as it laughs its way to their checking accounts. People want to be younger, thinner, more desireable, etc and *will* buy into fancy labels for a quick fix, be it for their weight, their skin, etc. People are conditioned in the American culture to be unhappy with themselves. They are conditioned by advertising and many other media facets, whether blatantly or subtly. The unhappier people are in their little worlds, the more they’ll spend to become happy. Simple capitalistic principles.

  15. Josie says:

    Rachel –

    Your last comment is fantastic.

    And yeh – seriously! I was really surprised by it too. I always have to ‘feel clean’ for OCD-ish reasons too, but it is interesting to know!

  16. jody says:

    My grandma is 63 (and oh my would she kill me for spilling the beans on that one…) and looks absolutely gorgeous. In highschool my friends thought she was my mother and even now if i ask my friends how old they think she is they say 45-50. <3 She has bought into the beauty industry quite frequently including having her eyeliner done permanently. She doesn’t now nor has she ever gone to department stores for her beauty purposes but Rite-Aid or Longs and she’s happy.
    I used to buy into the make-up thing when i was younger wearing make-up every day for about five years. I don’t always wear it now but if i am feeling grungy or down and i put effort into looking good (even if it is only sparkly eyeliner and mascara) it lifts my self-confidence for the day.
    Trying to deny that there aren’t subtle and not so subtle messages about how you should look is silly and the advertisors know that. As racheal said it’s a perfect capitalist scheme. We feel bad so we spend money- it’s why retail therapy is becoming a common thing now…
    sorry for writing so much

  17. beth says:

    So, MamaV, how do you feel about braces? These are meant to straighten teeth- a purely aesthetic purpose. Yet they are widely socially accepted and expected. I bet you’ll get your kids braces if their teeth are crooked! Also, I have fake boobs and they’re NOT hard! They’re better than tiny ones or saggy ones anyday!

  18. Anne says:

    Beth-Braces serve multiple purposes; they aren’t just used for aesthetic purposes. They can also (and are often used) to relieve TMJ, align a bite so teeth don’t chip & break from hitting eachother, and they also can be used to improve dental hygiene by removing excess space; or by creating space so it’s easier to floss and brush. It’s not the same as buying tube after tube of lipgloss or getting your teeth whitened.
    The cosmetic industry, on the other hand, exists solely to serve the dual role of making you feel bad about yourself, and then conveniently offering you one of their products to remedy the issue. In my opinion, wearing makeup is like apologizing for your face.

  19. Michelle says:

    Anne, I love your comment “wearing makeup is like apologizing you your face.”

    I believe beauty is a con game..
    enough is never enough for the world.
    You may be at the top.. but you know what? someone will find something about you to tear you down.

    I think it’s also about who wants to be better than everyone else. Everyone wants to be on top, so this world is constantly searching for ways to be more beautiful than the girl sitting next to her or being more muscular than the guy sitting next to him, etc. You know what I mean? It’s a tough world out there.. hold on for your lives.

  20. Ballerina says:

    I’ve been following this blog for a few months now, but this is my first time leaving any feedback. I find this topic interesting, mainly because I don’t really buy into the “beauty industry” but am terrified by the effects of aging. I don’t wear makeup and wear my hair short; it takes me 15 minutes to get ready for work each morning. I do, however, use facial scrub in the shower and facial/body moisturizer on my skin. I wear sunscreen daily because I am fair and will burn otherwise. I don’t want to feel beautiful, I want to feel clean and know that (hopefully) I am taking good care of my skin.

    I am trying to recover from ED/body image issues, and one of my main fears (besides weight gain) is aging – aging means the body deteriorates, metabolism slows down, skin sags, wrinkles appear – to me, all this things are so unattractive and undesirable. Yet, this only applies to women – men seem to age much more gracefully.

    I wish this double-standard didn’t exist – I wish aging women weren’t portrayed in our society as ugly and undesirable, and I wish I could accept the fact that my body will change and that it’s ok, but I’m not there yet.

    I’ll also answer the question “How much beautifying of ourselves is acceptable?” While I think the answer to this question is highly individual (there is no one “right” answer), for me shaving, exfoliating the skin, and using moisturizing products is acceptable – I see this as necessary hygiene. Makeup, excessive hair styling, tanning, and voluntary cosmetic treatments or surgery are too unnatural for me, and unacceptable to me personally.

  21. Rachel says:

    Josie –

    Thanks! I appreciate it!

    That totally throws me for a loop. Nowadays, I just enjoy the feeling of a nice, warm shower and how silky smoothe my skin feels afterward. If I don’t shower, I feel gross. Also, if somebody is walking around with bad B.O., that’s bad news for me. Until I am out of their “smell radius”, I can’t focus on anything else!!

    Jody –

    Your grandma sounds awesome! :-)

    Using a bit of makeup to feel good about yourself every now and again is one thing. I myself do that. For me it’s more about putting time into making myself presentable. If I am presentable, then I am approachable. If I am approachable, then I will blend in to those around me, and I will not stick out negatively in people’s minds.

    As far as the industry is concerned, there is pressure to look good on all fronts. Women especially, and yes, the industry knows that. They bank on it. Capitalism kind of blows.

    Anne –

    I *love* the “wearing makeup is like apologizing for your face” comment! Hilarious!

    There is pressure on all fronts for women (especially) today to ‘look good.’ Are we really better off than we were 60 years ago? Sure, we can work the jobs and stuff, but it’s no secret that we are judged based on appearance on all fronts. Prettier women get promotions, raises, etc more frequently – no secret there.

    However, I’ve got an interesting theory to throw out there… Are they just plain prettier and nothing more? Or does it have something to do with their personality? Yeah, being naturally attractive gives a leg up, but having confidence and self-esteem is just as much of a boost, and an even bigger boost in that big, scary world than just plain being attracitve.

    I do not deny that not-so-naturally-pretty women have to work harder, but I wonder sometimes if it’s more of a confidence and self-esteem thing… I find that as I am more confident, people are drawn to me. There are certainly days when I am definitely off of my game and as I don’t feel confident, people are driven away. As my self-confidence grows, people are drawn to me. This is something that I have only recently noticed. As the negativity has ceased, I have done better.

    It’s been a long haul for sure, but I am entering a new phase in my life and I am realizing that life is too fucking short to be subsisting on bagels, celery sticks, and Cosmo (the WORST magazine out there, in my opinion!!)

    The beauty industry is a con game and they bank on our insecurities. Life is too short for that, ladies (and gentlemen!). Get whatever you need from CVS or Walgreen’s and let that be that! Let the beauty radiate from within. Then the makeup is just a simple enhancement to our already beautiful selves, not a complete re-identification like the beauty industry hopes for and banks on.

  22. Jane says:

    I love my good old soap and water regime… it’s never failed yet ;o) I love the idea of getting wrinkles and gray hair and really…. I don’t see why anyone would want to hide what nature has given you.

    Being older represents maturity and offers proof that you can get on with life no matter what it throws at you…

    Hmmm….

  23. Josie says:

    Rachel – you are so right.

    Confidence and happiness draw people in and give someone success. Shame most of us are so lacking in it!

    It’s wonderful that you’re entering a new phase of life. I’m glad to be leaving my eating disordered life behind.. things are so much more ‘worthy’ now. Still got a long way to happy and healthy though, but ED-riddance is a start.

  24. Josie says:

    Jane – my hair is going grey… it has been since i was 15. I’ve got a whole streak. People are starting to notice i’m going grey now… and i’m only just 20.. ARGH

  25. Kat says:

    Commenting for two reasons.

    1)I own Hope In A Jar & love it. I also own lots of Suave items. I’m not kidding myself about aging. I’ve made a lot of peace with beauty & am mostly enjoying the aging process. But before I made peace with beauty, I bought every expensive anti-aging product I could get my hands on. No more. None of the products did any miracles & I wasted a lot of time & money. Now I simply like what I like & use what I like, regardless of price & promises made. I don’t want or expect any miracles. My skin is itchy & dry without cream. Most products have too much fragrance added for me. I’m very sensitive to perfumes. Hope In A Jar is free from all that & I think I’ll keep it.

    2)You are being tagged mama. Vesta at Big Fat Delicious tagged me. Hope you’ll play! Kat

  26. Duckie says:

    I like your blog but sometimes I think you go over the top. Theres women out there who enjoy that line of body washes and so on. Sometimes people like just nice stuff and not that I buy alot of non drugstore stuff but on somethings there is a difference. Whats wrong with having nice sayings on your bottle or jar? That jar is simply a cream it doesnt say “Anti Wrinkle cream” and then calling it HOPE. Id rather have nice little sayings on my bottles that lift you up, just the same as having an inspirational poster, sticker, tshirt etc. That jas says HOPE “Where there is hope there can be faith, where there is faith miracles can occur.” Sounds beautiful to me.

  27. mamavision says:

    Hi Lea: Welcome! I must be hitting the big time if I have psycho’s recommending me!

    I am glad you are here and that you enjoyed the post. Keep reading, the more you drill reality into your head, the better. Than you can spend the remainder of your life LIVING.

    Take it easy,
    mamaV

  28. mamavision says:

    Hi Beth: I am all for braces because if you are embarrassed about your teeth, you will not smile, and that is very sad.

    I think this raises a good point. I am middle of the road here;

    I am not saying “Don’t try to look better.”

    I am saying “Beauty should be fun, healthy and centered. The goal should not be to fix yourself.”

    If you can honestly look yourself in the mirror know you look good, wrinkles, cellulite and all…then you are on the right track.

    -mamaV

  29. mamavision says:

    Hi Duckie: There is nothing wrong with enjoying your natural beauty and using products to enhance it – all for it.

    Where we differ is I am not sitting around “HOPING” for a miracle as you put it, I am happy with who and what I am…what miracle are you waiting for and why?

    Is life going to be so much better if you have less wrinkles to the outside world? Nada. You are wasting your precious time.

    -mamaV

  30. mamavision says:

    Hi Kat: I am lost, what does #2 mean?

    I’ll play if you tell me what the heck you are talking about! :)

    -MV

  31. cat says:

    hey there…I agree with the rant on the beauty industry, but sometimes it feels a little like hyperbole. the last image, hope in a jar, is merely a really effective moisturizer…one I use daily because I have abnormally dry scaly skin on my face, beyond that of most people. I think there’s a difference between hiding your ‘flaws’ by buying into that whole game and using a moisturizer with spf in it. I guess I get that you chose this product based on the name, but sometimes its not a matter of vanitý or being gullible but a matter of comfort…like another reader said, its itchy and uncomfortable.

  32. Duckie says:

    No Mama you seemed to have read what you wanted to see… I said that if you look that it is NOT an ANTI WRINKLE cream. I also said that its just nice to see inspirational quotes on things. How come you can wear them on shirts, have them on posters and what not but just because you saw a moisturizer ( which lets not forget its NOT an Anti Wrinkle cream like you keep repeating) with the word hope on it (which you seemed tohave totally twisted and forgot to mention the rest of whats on it) you wanted to go on a big rant about things and diss the jar saying basically people who even use that line of products are just looking for Hope to have a pretty face and need to wake up lol. How is it you misread my whole previous post? Hmm…
    “I like your blog but sometimes I think you go over the top. Theres women out there who enjoy that line of body washes and so on. Sometimes people like just nice stuff and not that I buy alot of non drugstore stuff but on somethings there is a difference. Whats wrong with having nice sayings on your bottle or jar? That jar is simply a cream it doesnt say “Anti Wrinkle cream” and then calling it HOPE. Id rather have nice little sayings on my bottles that lift you up, just the same as having an inspirational poster, sticker, tshirt etc. That jar says HOPE “Where there is hope there can be faith, where there is faith miracles can occur.” Sounds beautiful to me.”

    I have a ring that says live, love, laugh. I also have a poster that says Life isnt about finding yourself, its about creating yourself.
    So I guess in your eyes these might be ok BUT if they were on a shampoo bottle, or a lotion/face cream bottle or jar, or GOD FOR BID on a compact or lip gloss that would be a big NO NO.

  33. Jen says:

    I personally don’t use expensive beauty products, but there are some that really work better than drugstore products. Some people who have posted have been judging people for wanting to look better and that’s wrong. If it makes people feel better to use those products, then let them be. I do agree that there’s some people who get sucked into that, but they don’t need to be judged they just need some self confidence, but don’t all of us who have eating disorders. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with wearing make up everyday, I do, and I’m not apologizing for my face, I thought that was a rediculous statement. If you’re happy with how you look without make up, that’s great, but some people don’t and there’s no need to criticize them.

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